Joey V. Barnett CV

Joey V. BarnettJoey V. Barnett, Ph.D. is Professor of Pharmacology, Medicine, Pediatrics, and Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology. He received his Bachelor’s Degree in 1981 from the University of Southern Indiana in Biology. He spent nine months as an undergraduate researcher at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory prior to entering the Ph.D. program in Pharmacology at VanderbiltUniversity. He received his Ph.D. in 1986 examining the mechanism of action of central nervous system stimulants. He completed postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School where his work focused on the development and regulation of autonomic responsiveness in the heart. As an instructor at Harvard, he trained in genetics and began his studies of growth factor signaling during cardiovascular development. He returned to Vanderbilt in 1992 as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and was promoted and tenured in Medicine prior to moving to the Department of Pharmacology in 2000 to direct the Ph.D. program. He has continued his studies of TGFb signaling during cardiovascular development and his laboratory is a leader in revealing the role of the Type III TGFb receptor in cardiovascular development. Dr. Barnett has served as a reviewer and consultant for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the American Heart Association. His research efforts have been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, and the March of Dimes. Dr. Barnett is passionate about education in the biomedical sciences. He has won numerous awards for teaching and mentoring, and he is nationally and internationally recognized for his achievements in graduate research education. Dr. Barnett currently serves as Acting Chair of the Department of Pharmacology, Assistant Dean of Physician-Researcher Training, Director of the Office of Medical Student Research, and Co-director of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Molecular Medicine Program at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.